The Greatest Motion Picture Created Since the Advent of Cinema

Reelin' in the years.Regular readers might have detected a cinema-centric trend in my recent dispatches from Nomaville. I can explain – since the official launch of FilmArt3, the motion picture division of Three House MultiMedia, my collaborator Raymond Scott Daigle and I have been mulling what we currently call the “Untitled FilmArt3 Feature Film Project.” This is an apt title since we haven’t settled on a story or even the vaguest notion of a premise. All we know is that our film will be “The Greatest Motion Picture CREATED Since the Advent of Cinema,” a technical term we gleaned from one of the many how-to books littering our office. Given the grandiosity of our vision, I, of course, suggested we commit our creative resources to “The Daedalus Howell Story.” Daigle, as fate would have it, had been developing a similar project – “The Raymond Scott Daigle Story.” I told him his title was lame. He told me that at least his film is going to have a happy ending. I asked him what he meant by that but we were interrupted by Flash Lely who pitched us “Shoot First: Confessions of a Well-Dressed Photo Editor.” I told Lely his title was lame, too. Daigle agreed and we showed Lely the door. Lely said our door was lame and we said that was a lame retort. Lely agreed and we all hugged. Then I began writing the Motion Picture of My Life. After a moment, I had a crushing sense of deja vu. This is why…

Scene One.

The Late Projectionist.

Regretflix ? The Netflix Paradox

RegretflixI pride myself on being something of a cinephile ? so much so, that I yearn to someday call myself a cineaste, which I understand means the same thing but sounds more erudite and, frankly, less creepy. It is this very aspiration that has led to my secret shame: I?m a Netflix horder. I have films sent that I neither watch nor return. Nor intend to, it seems.You see, watching some films is like flossing one?s teeth ? not entirely pleasant but you know it?s good for you, so you intend to do it. But you don’t. This is how I feel about my current “queue.” I quite liked director Hal Hartley?s ?Henry Fool,? a seriocomic portrait of a seedy would-be poet, braggart and liar who wreaks emotional havoc on those around him. Moreover, I absolutely adored its improbable sequel ?Fay Grim,? which takes place a decade later and posits that the fictions woven by the prequel?s titular character were all true. Brilliant. So, why can I not bring myself to watch the same director?s ?Possible Films: Short Works by Hal Hartley 1994-2004,? which has languished on an end table in my house for nine weeks? Continue reading “Regretflix ? The Netflix Paradox”

Regretflix – The Netflix Paradox

RegretflixI pride myself on being something of a cinephile – so much so, that I yearn to someday call myself a cineaste, which I understand means the same thing but sounds more erudite and, frankly, less creepy. It is this very aspiration that has led to my secret shame: I’m a Netflix horder. I have films sent that I neither watch nor return. Nor intend to, it seems.You see, watching some films is like flossing one’s teeth – not entirely pleasant but you know it’s good for you, so you intend to do it. But you don’t. This is how I feel about my current “queue.” I quite liked director Hal Hartley’s “Henry Fool,” a seriocomic portrait of a seedy would-be poet, braggart and liar who wreaks emotional havoc on those around him. Moreover, I absolutely adored its improbable sequel “Fay Grim,” which takes place a decade later and posits that the fictions woven by the prequel’s titular character were all true. Brilliant. So, why can I not bring myself to watch the same director’s “Possible Films: Short Works by Hal Hartley 1994-2004,” which has languished on an end table in my house for nine weeks? Continue reading “Regretflix – The Netflix Paradox”

Replica Released!

FilmArt3 partner and director Raymond Daigle has released Replica, his film depicting a night in the life of corporate copy shop clones. Now on YouTube, the award-winning festival cut featuers yours truly as well as Josh Staples and the camera work of Abe Levy.